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April 20, 2017

Want Free Plants For The Summer, Start Your Cuttings This Winter! – Annabelle Hydrangea Propagation – APRIL UPDATE

April 20, 2017

 

Winter Hardwood Cuttings Update

 

I just wanted to post a quick update on how my hardwood cuttings are doing.  Back in the middle of February I took hard cuttings of my Annabelle hydrangeas for propagating. You can read about that HERE.

It’s now almost the end of April and I thought I’d show you how my cuttings are doing?  I was a little nervous as this is the first time that I’ve ever propagated hardwood cuttings and I did it kind of late.  Some people do it in December, but I didn’t start until late February.

Here’s how they looked then:

And here’s how they look now:

top view

all of the cuttings  some close ups

these are cuttings of variegated red twig dogwood on the left and an oak leaf hydrangea on the right

Important

 

Even thought these cuttings are growing, they still have NOT developed adequate roots to transplant them into your garden beds.  You have to leave them alone until probably late July or August when roots have better developed.

I will certainly do another update on these as they continue to grow.

Lots of beautiful free plants

 

I’m just crazy about the Annabelle hydrangeas.  They are beautiful, they will grow in some shade, they are very low maintenance and they are so easy to propagate!

I have 77 of just the Annabelle hydrangea cuttings.  And a whole bunch of other things.  I can’t wait until August so that I can start transplanting and transforming my garden.

A simple way of getting free plants from the ones you already own.  If you already have some of these beauties, mark your calendars for winter and give winter hardwood cuttings propagation a try.  You can read more detailed information and how to in my Winter Propagation for Free Summer Plants post.

Let me know in the comments below if you’ve propagated hardwood cuttings before or if you plan on doing so.
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4 comments

  1. I had those in Pennsylvania. They grew like crazy. I used to cut some of the blooms,hang them upside-down and dry them for my mom. She used them in dried flower arrangements.

    1. Hey Lorraine, they do dry really well and are often used in arrangements. And I love that they grow like crazy. All a person really needs is one bush and can create an amazing garden just from cuttings. People sometimes call them the snowball plant or bush. 🙂

  2. That is a very impressive lot of cuttings Margaret. Is that a sand mix you have popped them into? Will you plant them all together in a line?

    1. Hi Eithne. It is a sand mixture. Hubby made me the cold frame last year and I just used coarse sand that I got from a home improvement store. I got the sand because it drains well (less chance of them rotting if it’s very wet). But if you don’t have a cover that will keep them moist, you do then need to water them more. I haven’t done a single thing to them since I stuck them in the sand. I’m not sure what I will do with them. I already have them in one a line in one area of my yard. There’s another area on the north side of my house that I planted a couple of baby ones I purchased last year that I want to fill up a little bit more to brighten that spot. I may give some away and I’m thinking that I might sell some at a market too.

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